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The Institute for The Musical Arts Co-Founder and 
Rock’n Roll Pioneer June Millington Releasing Autobiography 

June Millington’s Rock ‘N Roll story, of a girl from the Philippines who with her sister started a band that became “the first” all-girl rock ‘n roll band to be recognized as such internationally, is one only she can tell.  It’s the story of two immigrant girls who worked and played hard, tuned out the commonly accepted sexist slurs as well as the racism that informed the way most people initially ignored them, sang and played their asses off whenever and wherever they could and became the first all-female band to serve notice to the world that girls could sing and play ass-kicking rock ‘n roll.
 
Millington has launched a Kickstarter campaign with a goal of $25,000 to support the promotion, design and collector’s edition first run of her recently finished autobiography detailing her childhood in the Philippines, her family’s migration to the United States and the rock’n roll dream that carried her and her sister bass player Jean to Hollywood to form the groundbreaking all female rock band Fanny.  Never one to sit by the wayside and wait for someone else to do the work for her, Millington is making sure this story, like so much of women’s history, does not get buried or told by someone else.  All proceeds from the autobiography will go to support the work Millington currently does for women and girls in music through the IMA which she co-founded and of which she is currently Artistic Director.  The Kickstarter  campaign ends on September 11th.

Epic Frequency

The art project Epic Frequency sells beautiful prints created from the waveforms of classic songs and historical audio moments, like Neil Armstrong’s “One Small Step”, The Beatles’ “Here Comes The Sun” and JFK’s “Ask Not.”

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Soviet-Era Bootleg Recordings of Banned Western Music Pressed on Discarded X-Ray Plates 

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.” 

via Junk Culture

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           PUNK THE CAPITAL, STRAIGHT FROM WASHINGTON D.C.                                                         Documentary 

                           by Paul Bishow & James Schneider

A documentary exploring how Punk took hold in Washington D.C., from 1976 through the harDCore explosion of the early 1980s.

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Punk the Capital takes us to the heart of why D.C. Punk has such staying power. 

For those who are already aware of this inspiring and influential story, Punk the Capital provides a fresh perspective and in-depth portrait of how D.C. Punk began, full of newly discovered footage and personal accounts, directed by two of D.C.’s veteran film makers. For those who do not know much about Washington D.C. culture or why D.C. Punk matters, this film will be a must-see.

For More Info And To Pledge Go HERE

They Were Banned In The USSR
The blacklist, titled ‘The approximate list of foreign musical groups and artists, whose repertoires contain ideologically harmful compositions’, was drawn up by Komsomol, the Communist Party’s Youth Wing. It was written in the obscure and verbose language of Soviet bureaucracy and riddled with classic Cold War paranoia. […]
The document stated: “This information is recommended for the purpose of intensifying control over the activities of discotheques” and “must also be provided to all VIA [vocal instrument ensembles]“.
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They Were Banned In The USSR

The blacklist, titled ‘The approximate list of foreign musical groups and artists, whose repertoires contain ideologically harmful compositions’, was drawn up by Komsomol, the Communist Party’s Youth Wing. It was written in the obscure and verbose language of Soviet bureaucracy and riddled with classic Cold War paranoia. […]

The document stated: “This information is recommended for the purpose of intensifying control over the activities of discotheques” and “must also be provided to all VIA [vocal instrument ensembles]“.

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Manhattan Meets Punks

Black Flag at Polliwog Park, Manhattan Beach, CA (22-07-1979)

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Watch Kraftwerk’s 1970 TV Debut

For the first time, the debut TV apperance of Kraftwerk has surfaced online. The 40-minute performance was aired in Germany on Rockpalast in 1970. 

The concert features founding members Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider, along with drummer Klaus Dinger who left to form Neu! the following year. 

Let’s see if you’re hardcore and manage to watch all of it…

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A 17 Year Old Alex Lifeson Tries To Convince His Parents That He Should Quit School And Play Music For A Living

Here’s a pretty incredible seven minute clip from 1973 documentary, Come On Children, featuring a 17 year old, Alex Lifeson of Rush. The film interviewed a bunch of Toronto teens, then invited them to live on a farm for 10 weeks, in an attempt to get deep inside the psyche of a gloomy suburban adolescent.

In this clip, Lifeson (who was already a father to his first son, Justin) tries to convince his Serbian emigrant parents that his plan to quit the 12 grade and play in a band full time, is the right decision. 

Probably not only a “must see” for the Rush fan but also for everyone who’s trying to convince their parents why they want to start a band. 

via Cherrybombed